Crowns

Teeth

Crowns

Older types of crowns had metal bases with an attached porcelain product and used to have a tendency for developing black lines bordering the gums. This aesthetic flaw was caused by the metal base that the crown materials used to necessitate with those outmoded procedures. New products for this type of dental restoration provide a seamless bond further contributing to a natural appearance. While the strength of all-porcelain crowns that do not rely on this metal backing may be mildly weaker in their construction, it is true that all normal mastication functions can be performed with them. Certainly, their integrity remains well engineered for this purpose.


Teeth

Gold crowns are made of cast gold, a technique that has been in existence for over a hundred years and is the most successful. As aesthetics has become more of a factor, the use of gold is declining. Most dentists themselves prefer gold restorations for their own teeth knowing that they will serve well for several decades, in some case more than 50 years. Cast gold crowns have no match with regard to long-term service and minimal wear to opposing teeth, their greatest advantage. They may ultimately fail because of predictable wear of the metal through to underlying tooth structure and because of recurrent caries (decay).
Selecting a gold crown for your tooth is a personal choice, however, at Legends Family Dental we may recommend a gold crown if you exhibit heavy wear patterns on your teeth. People with metal allergies, such as a nickel allergy, should ensure we are made aware of their allergy before a gold crown is fabricated. High noble alloy that contains no nickel or other common metals that cause allergic reactions should be carefully used if you do in fact have a metal allergy.

Teeth

Today dental crowns are constructed entirely out of porcelain, which gives your dental crown a remarkable similarity to natural teeth in form and function. At Tempe Dental Care, we have a huge selection of options for color matching and design control to retain coordinating features with your existing dentistry. The appearance of our porcelain crowns are indistinguishable from your natural teeth.
One of the biggest benefits of dental porcelain is that it can be created to closely replicate the look of your natural tooth enamel. In addition, it provides the necessary resilience and strength. These are an excellent choice when repairing a damaged tooth because the porcelain crown can replace the entire external portion of the tooth – down to the gum. Dental crowns are not just used to recreate the function and form of a damaged tooth, they can also be used to create an even better aesthetic appearance.
Why Choose A Porcelain Crown?
Porcelain crowns are the treatment of choice to replace the exterior portion of a tooth, to restore it’s original function, and to create a natural appearance. If damage has occurred due to a traumatic event or tooth decay has destroyed most of the original tooth, a porcelain crown can help restore your smile. Dental crowns may also be an option if the structure of your teeth has been compromised from grinding or clenching your teeth.
Dental crowns and veneers are secured and situated similarly. The dentist will use a light-sensitive resin placed between the original tooth and crown which will harden with a special curing light.
Porcelain Fused to Metal
PFM crowns are relatively esthetic restorations that have been in use for more than 40 years. In one way, they combine the best of both worlds, a crown made of “precious or noble” metal (gold or platinum), which is strong, fits precisely and is bonded/cemented to the tooth. This metal substructure (beneath the porcelain) imparts strength and makes up for the porcelain's weakness and fracture potential.
The downside — porcelain can badly abrade opposing teeth causing undue wear. PFM crowns have an “esthetic” longevity of about 10 years but can lose the stains applied to make them look natural over time, particularly if the gum tissues also recede. They have a “functional” longevity of about 20 years. Most common reasons for failure include occasional fracture of pieces of porcelain from the metal and recurrent decay on the margin areas (where they join to the natural tooth).
A compromise between gold and porcelain fused to metal crowns would be a cast gold crown with a porcelain “facing” on the side for esthetics if needed.

A zirconia crown is a popular type of all-ceramic crown which is worn to improve the appearance of a tooth which has become stained or disfigured over the years. They are durable, easy to wear and long lasting.
Plus zirconia crowns have a translucent appearance which means that they are indistinguishable from your own teeth. It is hard to spot a zirconia crown amongst natural teeth.
What is a zirconia crown?
This type of crown is made from zirconia, a very strong material which is compatible with the human body. Zirconia is used in many other medical applications such as artificial joints and is known for its strength and durability.
Zirconia is a type of crystal which is long lasting and indestructible.
Plus there is no fear about the body rejecting zirconia or displaying an allergic reaction to it. It is safe to use and preferred by many people to porcelain fused to metal crowns.
Advantages of a zirconia crown
There are three advantages which are:
Strength: zirconia crowns last longer than other types of crowns.
Aesthetics: these crowns have an attractive translucent colour which blends in well with the other teeth.
Retain more of the existing tooth: minimal preparation is required which means more of the original tooth is preserved. This is useful if the crown needs to be removed.
So, a good choice if you are looking for a strong, long lasting and visually appealing crown. They are ideal at covering signs of damage or staining as well as helping to maintain the function of the tooth.
Disadvantages of a zirconia crown.
The tough, durable nature of a zirconia crown can work against it as well as in its favour. This material has an abrasive quality which can cause friction against the root of the tooth as well as other teeth.